Book reviews, new books, publishing news, book giveaways, and author interviews

Review: Wild Card by Steven Lochran

Review: Wild Card by Steven Lochran

If you're new here, why not subscribe to our email updates or follow us on Facebook? You can also add us to your Google Reader. Thanks for visiting! Anyone who’s been reading this site for a while knows that I regularly pass on zingy series fiction to my husband. Though his reading interests are polar opposites of mine, he’s possibly an even tougher...

Review: The Physiognomy by Jeffrey Ford

Review: The Physiognomy by Jeffrey Ford

Back when I was in uni I had a bit of an affair with the short fiction of Jeffrey Ford. Though not the most elegant writer out there, his work is famously strange, wide-reaching and wide-ranging. Of his long-form work I’d only read bizarre and eerie The Portrait of Mrs Charbuque, which I remember quite enjoying, particularly as I read it around the same...

Review: Not Just a Witch and Dial a Ghost by Eva Ibbotson

Review: Not Just a Witch and Dial a Ghost by Eva Ibbotson

Medicine might go down with the help of a spoonful of sugar, but Mary Poppins herself would surely agree that middle grade fiction is a sweet enough medicine in its own right. It’s the genre I reach for whenever I’m feeling a little down or disillusioned; my fictional heart home. It’s a genre where it’s okay to be cheerful and upbeat,...

Complementary colours and A Corner of White by Jaclyn Moriarty

Complementary colours and A Corner of White by Jaclyn Moriarty

  It’s like we’re complementary colours…you know what those are, right? Colours that make each other disappear? So if you cross red with green—or blue with orange, or yellow with purple—you get a pale, pale colour, almost white… Interestingly, though, if you put complementary colours next to each other, they make each other...

Dinner parties and Rick Riordan’s The Lost Hero

Dinner parties and Rick Riordan’s The Lost Hero

  The other night I attended a Christmas dinner for fourteen people, only a handful of whom actually knew each other. We all know how these events play out: awkward introductions where people try to define their lives as concisely as possible so as not to bore the others, and yet verbosely enough that they might find something, anything in common so that...

Narrative scope and insularity and Laura Powell’s Burn Mark

Narrative scope and insularity and Laura Powell’s Burn Mark

  Laura Powell’s recently released Burn Mark is a book that seems to tick all the right boxes. The premise is solid and intriguing, the world-building is rich and believable, and the characters realistic. And yet I found it disappointingly bland. Perhaps it’s that my paranormal palate has been overwhelmed over the past few years. Perhaps...

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